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“The urge to individuate is the strongest of all human urges,
and will manifest itself in a negative form
if we refuse to attune to it consciously.”

~ C. G. Jung ~

Depth Psychotherapy

 

There are many kinds of psychotherapy from which to choose when you decide to embark on or resume a therapeutic process. In order to help you decide if my way of working is right for you, I want to tell you a little about depth psychotherapy and my particular depth orientation, Jungian Analysis. (For the latter, click on “Jungian Analysis.”)

Depth psychotherapy encompasses a broad range of therapeutic orientations. Though the various depth therapies may differ in the specifics and terminology, they all orient to the unconscious. The psyche as a totality has two mirroring and compensatory sides: a conscious side, that of which we are aware and an unconscious side, that of which is yet unknown to us. The unconscious is both the foundation of our personality and its development and continues to impact everything about us – what we do, feel, say, and are, for better or for worse, throughout our lives. As we grow and develop our cognitive functioning, we tend to split off from this deeper structural layer that houses the affects, instincts, images, and sense perceptions. Emotional and/or physical trauma accelerates this splitting and widens the gap between these two realms of the psyche, the inner and outer worlds. Such disconnection from these deeper layers of our psyche shows up as emotional distress and illness, along with symptoms such as depression (a loss of soul or disconnect from soul), anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, relational discord, psychosomatic illness, and various addictions. For wholeness and the sense of a substantive self, we must reconnect with this fundamental part of us, our unconscious depths. Therefore, depth psychotherapy is an attempt to reorient the individual inwardly.

Just as a deep physical wound heals from the inside out, deep emotional and psychic wounds must heal from within oneself. Depth psychotherapies are based on the principle that the healing comes from within the individual’s psychic depths. We all have an instinctual impulse toward becoming more fully who we are – toward becoming our innate, authentic self. (This idea of wholeness is different than that of perfection whose “strivings toward” can lead us to taking on a false self.) There is something within the deep unconscious that knows what needs to be done and a force that drives the process. Successful therapy enables the patient to set up a line of communication between the ego (conscious realm) and this guiding force (unconscious realm). The therapist’s task is not to give advice or to tell a patient what to do but, together with the patient, discover where this guiding force is leading him or her. In this way, depth therapies differ from those therapies that work only within the conscious realm and are directed by the therapist’s and/or patient’s ego – setting objective goals and creating treatment plans with specific interventions in an attempt to meet the goals set within a specific time frame. Depth psychotherapy is an unfolding process that is directed and guided from within the individual’s psyche.


Depth therapy can be described as a “being with” oneself in the presence of another, the therapist or analyst.
It is about “sitting with,” being a witness to, and experiencing the various parts of oneself that manifest in the therapy process. It is through the experiencing of these rejected, unrelated, undeveloped or underdeveloped, and often disdainful parts of oneself emanating from the deeper layers of the unconscious that allows their subsequent integration into the conscious realm of the psyche. Our dreams, day visions, symptoms, feelings, and interactions with others serve as guides to this integrative process. When the ego attunes to the soul in this way, we feel a sense of calm, of groundedness, of flow, and of spaciousness within our psyche. This greater psychic space allows a fluidity among and a relatedness to the various “states of being” in which we find ourselves. As a result, we experience more of our innate selves, more of our wholeness, which ultimately gives us a greater capacity to reflectively “meet” what ever crosses our paths. Depth psychotherapy encourages this self-reflective stance which enables us to pause, experience , and to respond thoughtfully rather than to react impulsively. Additionally, the more space we have in our psyche for our whole being, the more compassion and relatedness we have both toward ourselves and toward others. Thus, another intention of depth therapy is that of facilitating a meaningful connection to one’s soul and, in so doing, a meaningful connection to others.

By instinctual design, the process of developing a sense of self and more fully becoming oneself can only take place within a relationship. This phenomenon begins at, or possibly before, birth and lasts throughout an individual’s lifetime. The therapeutic relationship, with its potential to be transforming and healing, is a key determining factor in the successful outcome of all therapies. In depth psychotherapy, the relationship becomes the vessel within which the therapy process takes place. Together therapist and patient create a relationship and a co-constructed space within which the therapy unfolds. Through the experience of being with the feelings generated within this co-created space, observing them and commenting on them without judgment or blame, we each discover and/or re-discover parts of ourselves. It is this conscious experience of the “field” that brings understanding, transformation and healing.

Individuals • Couples • Adults • Adolescents

304.261.2771 • Harpers Ferry, WV • Shepherdstown, WV

Home  |  Profile  |  Depth Psychotherapy  |  Jungian Analysis  | ReflectionsEvents  |  Contact

“The urge to individuate is the strongest of all human urges,
and will manifest itself in a negative form
if we refuse to attune to it consciously.”

~ C. G. Jung ~

Depth Psychotherapy

There are many kinds of psychotherapy from which to choose when you decide to embark on or resume a therapeutic process. In order to help you decide if my way of working is right for you, I want to tell you a little about depth psychotherapy and my particular depth orientation, Jungian Analysis. (For the latter, click on “Jungian Analysis.”)

Depth psychotherapy encompasses a broad range of therapeutic orientations. Though the various depth therapies may differ in the specifics and terminology, they all orient to the unconscious. The psyche as a totality has two mirroring and compensatory sides: a conscious side, that of which we are aware and an unconscious side, that of which is yet unknown to us. The unconscious is both the foundation of our personality and its development and continues to impact everything about us – what we do, feel, say, and are, for better or for worse, throughout our lives. As we grow and develop our cognitive functioning, we tend to split off from this deeper structural layer that houses the affects, instincts, images, and sense perceptions. Emotional and/or physical trauma accelerates this splitting and widens the gap between these two realms of the psyche, the inner and outer worlds. Such disconnection from these deeper layers of our psyche shows up as emotional distress and illness, along with symptoms such as depression (a loss of soul or disconnect from soul), anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, relational discord, psychosomatic illness, and various addictions. For wholeness and the sense of a substantive self, we must reconnect with this fundamental part of us, our unconscious depths. Therefore, depth psychotherapy is an attempt to reorient the individual inwardly.

Just as a deep physical wound heals from the inside out, deep emotional and psychic wounds must heal from within oneself. Depth psychotherapies are based on the principle that the healing comes from within the individual’s psychic depths. We all have an instinctual impulse toward becoming more fully who we are – toward becoming our innate, authentic self. (This idea of wholeness is different than that of perfection whose “strivings toward” can lead us to taking on a false self.) There is something within the deep unconscious that knows what needs to be done and a force that drives the process. Successful therapy enables the patient to set up a line of communication between the ego (conscious realm) and this guiding force (unconscious realm). The therapist’s task is not to give advice or to tell a patient what to do but, together with the patient, discover where this guiding force is leading him or her. In this way, depth therapies differ from those therapies that work only within the conscious realm and are directed by the therapist’s and/or patient’s ego – setting objective goals and creating treatment plans with specific interventions in an attempt to meet the goals set within a specific time frame. Depth psychotherapy is an unfolding process that is directed and guided from within the individual’s psyche.


Depth therapy can be described as a “being with” oneself in the presence of another, the therapist or analyst.
It is about “sitting with,” being a witness to, and experiencing the various parts of oneself that manifest in the therapy process. It is through the experiencing of these rejected, unrelated, undeveloped or underdeveloped, and often disdainful parts of oneself emanating from the deeper layers of the unconscious that allows their subsequent integration into the conscious realm of the psyche. Our dreams, day visions, symptoms, feelings, and interactions with others serve as guides to this integrative process. When the ego attunes to the soul in this way, we feel a sense of calm, of groundedness, of flow, and of spaciousness within our psyche. This greater psychic space allows a fluidity among and a relatedness to the various “states of being” in which we find ourselves. As a result, we experience more of our innate selves, more of our wholeness, which ultimately gives us a greater capacity to reflectively “meet” what ever crosses our paths. Depth psychotherapy encourages this self-reflective stance which enables us to pause, experience , and to respond thoughtfully rather than to react impulsively. Additionally, the more space we have in our psyche for our whole being, the more compassion and relatedness we have both toward ourselves and toward others. Thus, another intention of depth therapy is that of facilitating a meaningful connection to one’s soul and, in so doing, a meaningful connection to others.

By instinctual design, the process of developing a sense of self and more fully becoming oneself can only take place within a relationship. This phenomenon begins at, or possibly before, birth and lasts throughout an individual’s lifetime. The therapeutic relationship, with its potential to be transforming and healing, is a key determining factor in the successful outcome of all therapies. In depth psychotherapy, the relationship becomes the vessel within which the therapy process takes place. Together therapist and patient create a relationship and a co-constructed space within which the therapy unfolds. Through the experience of being with the feelings generated within this co-created space, observing them and commenting on them without judgment or blame, we each discover and/or re-discover parts of ourselves. It is this conscious experience of the “field” that brings understanding, transformation and healing.

Individuals • Couples • Adults • Adolescents

304.261.2771 • Harpers Ferry, WV • Shepherdstown, WV