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“… since everything living strives for wholeness, the inevitable one-sidedness of our conscious life is continually being corrected and compensated by the universal human being in us, whose goal is the ultimate integration of conscious and unconscious, or better, the assimilation of the ego to a wider personality.”
~ On the Nature of Dreams~

(1945/1948), CW 8, 557

“Without the experience of the opposites there is no experience of wholeness…”
~ Psychology and Alchemy~

(1944), CW 12, 24

“The ego keeps its integrity only if it does not identify with one of the opposites, and if it understands how to hold the balance between them.  This is possible only if it remains conscious of both at once… ”
~ On the Nature of the Psyche~

(1947/1954), CW 8, 425

Jungian Analysis

 

Jungian Analysis (Analytical Psychology) is based on the work of Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung. (1875 – 1961)

jungThe psyche consists of two realms, the conscious and the unconscious.  In Jungian Analysis we focus on cultivating “an honest and serious relationship”  between the conscious and the unconscious halves of our psyche — between the ego (the center of the conscious realm) and the Self (the center of the psyche).  Carl Jung calls this natural and life-long process of integrating these opposites “individuation.”   Individuation is the process of becoming more fully our authentic selves — a movement toward wholeness.

Unconscious contents have the potential to affect us adversely if they are not brought into relationship with the ego.  As we become more conscious of the unconscious influences on our life, we gain more control of our lives, as well as a sense of aliveness and grounding in our own being.  We are then less swayed by both inner and outer forces.  Also, the more we grow the capacity within our psyche to hold the tension of the opposites, the more compassion and relatedness we have both toward ourselves and toward others.

Jung posits that the psyche is a self-regulating system just as is the body.  Every process that goes too far in one direction calls forth compensation.  Dreams are a significant part of this self-regulating system.  Carl Jung saw dreams as having a compensatory nature to our conscious self that helps to restore our psychic equilibrium.  Working with our dreams is one of the best ways to see how our psyche sees us or a particular situation — often offering a more comprehensive or contradictory view of things.  He viewed dreams as a way of reflecting on ourselves, our whole self.  Taking our dreams seriously can give us the awe-inspiring experience of how our individual psychological, emotional and spiritual selves are being guided from within our own psyche — a unique and ‘tailor-made’ path for each of us.

The foundational and germinal layer of our psyche speaks a symbolic language — images, sense perceptions, instincts, feelings, intuition, the irrational.  Carl Jung frequently stated that we must reconnect with this layer of our psyche if we are to become whole.  There is a real danger when our rational selves move too far away from this life-giving layer of the psyche.  In Jungian Analysis, we work to develop a symbolic attitude — to see beneath the surface, to see the many facets of the symbolic image, to see the connections among the elements and dynamics of the inner landscape and those of the outer life and to see the telos (the purpose or meaning) within the image.  Symbols, the best possible expression of the unknowable, hold the past, present and the future and thus have the transforming power to move us forward on our individuation path.

Jungian Analysis is about transformation — a deep and authentic change in our very being.  Jung states:  “The goal is transformation — not one that is predetermined, but rather an indeterminable change…”.   When we touch our souls so deeply, we also experience the numinous — that which is beyond our conscious being.   Symbols reach to these very depths of our souls.

A Jungian orientation does not focus on the healing of symptoms per se, but on deciphering their purpose and meaning as it relates to the individuation process.  Jung states,  “There is no illness that is not at the same time an unsuccessful attempt at a cure.”  Our symptoms — such as depression, anxiety, relational problems, and addictions ask us to see where we are blocked from fulfilling our potential wholeness or have strayed too far from who we authentically are.

Although in Jungian Analysis we focus on ‘becoming’ more wholly our innate self, we also explore the analysand’s past and the patterns of defensive behaviors of the ‘adapted’ self that are formed in childhood and how these continue to live in the present — once a survival mechanism, but now a limiting and deadening defensive structure that hinder us from moving beyond the status quo.  This old narrative forms a prison-like structure of pain and old wounds that distorts our thoughts and feelings about ourselves and others which impacts our current life, particularly our relationship with ourselves and with others.

Jungian Analysis takes place in a face to face dialectical conversation between the analyst and the analysand.  Together the analyst and analysand work with the analysand’s dreams, life experiences, symptoms, spontaneous products of the the imagination such as visions and fantasies through a symbolic and teleologic lens in order to discern their purpose or meaning as it relates to the analysand’s individuation process — an ever-unfolding path toward wholeness.  There is no recipe for this path toward wholeness; the direction comes from within each individual who pursues the analytic process.  If successful, psychotherapy will result in the ego taking its rightful place in regards to the greater psyche.  This would be an ego in mutual and reciprocal relationship with the center of the psyche, the Self.

Life offers us many opportunities to consciously experience and know ourselves if we have a curiosity about our inner workings and the courage to turn inward and face what the ego has long rejected and/or has not yet developed.  This venture can prove to be rocky and painful at times since change and new discoveries of self can come only when the psyche’s old defensive and adapted structures have weakened, collapsed or have been dissolved.  On the other hand, it can be exciting with its reward of a felt sense of substance, a genuine self-confidence and a new capacity to face obstacles that could thwart our intended path.

Individuals • Couples • Adults • Adolescents

304.261.2771 • Harpers Ferry, WV • Shepherdstown, WV

Home  |  Profile  |  Depth Psychotherapy  |  Jungian Analysis  | ReflectionsEvents  |  Contact

“… since everything living strives for wholeness, the inevitable one-sidedness of our conscious life is continually being corrected and compensated by the universal human being in us, whose goal is the ultimate integration of conscious and unconscious, or better, the assimilation of the ego to a wider personality.”
~ On the Nature of Dreams (1945/1948), CW 8, 557~

“Without the experience of the opposites there is no experience of wholeness…”
~ Psychology and Alchemy (1944), CW 12, 24~

“The ego keeps its integrity only if it does not identify with one of the opposites, and if it understands how to hold the balance between them.  This is possible only if it remains conscious of both at once… ”
~ On the Nature of the Psyche (1947/1954), CW 8, 425~

Jungian Analysis

Jungian Analysis (Analytical Psychology) is based on the work of Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung. (1875 – 1961)

The psyche consists of two realms, the conscious and the unconscious.  In Jungian Analysis we focus on cultivating “an honest and serious relationship”  between the conscious and the unconscious halves of our psyche — between the ego (the center of the conscious realm) and the Self (the center of the psyche).  Carl Jung calls this natural and life-long process of integrating these opposites “individuation.”   Individuation is the process of becoming more fully our authentic selves — a movement toward wholeness.

Unconscious contents have the potential to affect us adversely if they are not brought into relationship with the ego.  As we become more conscious of the unconscious influences on our life, we gain more control of our lives, as well as a sense of aliveness and grounding in our own being.  We are then less swayed by both inner and outer forces.  Also, the more we grow the capacity within our psyche to hold the tension of the opposites, the more compassion and relatedness we have both toward ourselves and toward others.

Jung posits that the psyche is a self-regulating system just as is the body.  Every process that goes too far in one direction calls forth compensation.  Dreams are a significant part of this self-regulating system.  Carl Jung saw dreams as having a compensatory nature to our conscious self that helps to restore our psychic equilibrium.  Working with our dreams is one of the best ways to see how our psyche sees us or a particular situation — often offering a more comprehensive or contradictory view of things.  He viewed dreams as a way of reflecting on ourselves, our whole self.  Taking our dreams seriously can give us the awe-inspiring experience of how our individual psychological, emotional and spiritual selves are being guided from within our own psyche — a unique and ‘tailor-made’ path for each of us.

The foundational and germinal layer of our psyche speaks a symbolic language — images, sense perceptions, instincts, feelings, intuition, the irrational.  Carl Jung frequently stated that we must reconnect with this layer of our psyche if we are to become whole.  There is a real danger when our rational selves move too far away from this life-giving layer of the psyche.  In Jungian Analysis, we work to develop a symbolic attitude — to see beneath the surface, to see the many facets of the symbolic image, to see the connections among the elements and dynamics of the inner landscape and those of the outer life and to see the telos (the purpose or meaning) within the image.  Symbols, the best possible expression of the unknowable, hold the past, present and the future and thus has the transforming power to move us forward on our individuation path.

Jungian Analysis is about transformation — a deep and authentic change in our very being.  Jung states:  “The goal is transformation — not one that is predetermined, but rather an indeterminable change…”.   When we touch our souls so deeply, we also experience the numinous — that which is beyond our conscious being.   Symbols reach to these very depths of our souls.

A Jungian orientation does not focus on the healing of symptoms per se, but on deciphering their purpose and meaning as it relates to the individuation process.  Jung states,  “There is no illness that is not at the same time an unsuccessful attempt at a cure.”  Our symptoms — such as depression, anxiety, relational problems, and addictions ask us to see where we are blocked from fulfilling our potential wholeness or have strayed too far from who we authentically are.

Although in Jungian Analysis we focus on ‘becoming’ more wholly our innate self, we also explore the analysand’s past and the patterns of defensive behaviors of the ‘adapted’ self that are formed in childhood and how these continue to live in the present — once a survival mechanism, but now a limiting and deadening defensive structure that hinder us from moving beyond the status quo.  This old narrative forms a prison-like structure of pain and old wounds that distorts our thoughts and feelings about ourselves and others which impacts our current life, particularly our relationship with ourselves and with others.

Jungian Analysis takes place in a face to face dialectical conversation between the analyst and the analysand.  Together the analyst and analysand work with the analysand’s dreams, life experiences, symptoms, spontaneous products of the the imagination such as visions and fantasies through a symbolic and teleologic lens in order to discern their purpose or meaning as it relates to the analysand’s individuation process — an ever-unfolding path toward wholeness.  There is no recipe for this path toward wholeness; the direction comes from within each individual who pursues the analytic process.  If successful, psychotherapy will result in the ego taking its rightful place in regards to the greater psyche.  This would be an ego in mutual and reciprocal relationship with the center of the psyche, the Self.

Life offers us many opportunities to consciously experience and know ourselves if we have a curiosity about our inner workings and the courage to turn inward and face what the ego has long rejected and/or has not yet developed.  This venture can prove to be rocky and painful at times since change and new discoveries of self can come only when the psyche’s old defensive and adapted structures have weakened, collapsed or have been dissolved.  On the other hand, it can be exciting with its reward of a felt sense of substance, a genuine self-confidence and a new capacity to face obstacles that could thwart our intended path.

Individuals • Couples • Adults • Adolescents

304.261.2771 • Harpers Ferry, WV • Shepherdstown, WV